Informationen about types of rides

There’s a specific place you’ve always wanted to visit? After endless searching, you’ve finally found the perfect trip? You’re all ready to book, except that you’re not quite sure that you’re able to meet the required skill and fitness levels? Here’s where you can find out everything you need to know about the types of trips we offer, and how challenging they are in terms of technique and fitness.

Types of rides

You can apply viewing filters to select trips according to their characteristics. With all our trips, whether “Tour” or “Bike & Hike”, we try to keep the singletrack proportion as high as possible. “Tours” tend to be a little more relaxed, with additional focus on specific aspects of the local area (food, culture, etc.). In general, the more mountainous the region we’re riding in, the more demanding the trip will be.

On a Tour we like to show you the finest, often lesser known aspects of the area. Cultural and culinary delights appear at every corner along the way. Slowing down, enjoying yourself, being in the here and now – that’s what it’s all about. Nevertheless, there are always plenty of excellent offroad riding opportunities. Uphill riding is mainly on forestry roads (smooth, wide, unpaved tracks created for 4×4 forestry vehicles); downhill is a good balance between forestry roads and straightforward singletracks. We are always careful to ensure that accommodation is the right combination of elegance, charm and homeliness.

The key facts:

  • Hardtail-compatible
  • Mostly suitable for families.
  • Lots of opportunities for enjoying the local culture and fine cuisine, as well as simply soaking up the atmosphere.
  • We ride at “conversational speed”.
  • 3-4 hours a day in the saddle.
  • Uphill riding is mainly on forestry roads with relaxed gradients.
  • Downhill is on a combination of forestry roads and straightforward singletracks.
  • Emphasis on relaxed enjoyment, with regular breaks.

The sport of mountainbiking has many subdivisions. Because the boundaries between them are often fluid, we combine the downhill-oriented forms under the term “All-Mountain”. For us, that means getting close to nature, totally switching off from everyday life, and enjoying the freedom that a bike gives. But we also enjoy the demands on our skill and fitness that this kind of riding brings.

Flow, fun and trails aplenty, for riders of all abilities. And if a section does turn out to be a bit of a stretch, techniquewise, there’ll be the opportunity to have a quick practice session. When riding uphill on our All-Mountain tours you can expect straightforward forestry roads and technical singletracks, plus a few short sections where you’ll be pushing or carrying your bike. Downhill, you’ll experience both flowing and technical singletracks. Forestry roads and paved roads are kept to a minimum.

The key facts. Details are presented in the description of each trip.

  • We recommend a full-suspension bike with at least 130 mm of travel.
  • Uphill riding is on paved roads and forestry roads: a means to an end. We may sometimes also climb steep sections or be riding on loose surfaces.
  • 5-8 hours a day in the saddle.
  • Downhill is mainly on singletracks of varying degrees of difficulty.
  • Climbs are often fairly long, with limited breaks.
  • Minibus and/or ski-lifts used in some cases.
  • Mountainous environment, sometimes at high altitude.
  • Possibility of short carrying/pushing sections; good balance and agility necessary.
  • Limited refreshment facilities en route – sufficiently capacious rucksack needed for clothing, food, etc.

Loving your bike can sometimes mean giving it a helping hand – or shoulder. And then being able to lean it against a summit cairn while you watch the buzzards soaring, taking in the view around you, and looking forward to a spectacular descent. Compared to our All-Mountain trips, a Bike & Hike ride will include longer sections of pushing or carrying; it may even be the case that bikes need to be pushed all the way to the top. You’ll find full details in each trip’s description. That extra weight on your back may be new to you at first, but with the right carrying technique you and your bike will be going places so special that you soon forget about the effort required to get you there.

The key facts. Details are presented in the description of each trip.

  • We recommend a full-suspension bike with at least 130 mm of travel.
  • 5-8 h hours a day in the saddle.
  • Uphill riding is on paved roads and forestry roads: a means to an end. We may sometimes also climb steep sections or be riding on loose surfaces.
  • Long sections of pushing or carrying.
  • Downhill is mainly on singletracks of varying degrees of difficulty.
  • Minibus and/or ski-lifts used in some cases.
  • Mountainous environment, sometimes at high altitude.
  • Stable footwear required, suitable for walking and carrying – ideally ankle-high.
  • Good balance and agility essential.
  • Limited refreshment facilities en route – sufficiently capacious rucksack needed for clothing, food, etc.
  • nötig

Mountainbikers don’t simply fall out of the sky – although sometimes from their bikes … For the right balance between safety and fun when riding off road, general competency and a few specific skills are a must. We can show you everything from basic skills like being able to brake without gouging the track through to specialist techniques like shifting the rear wheel in switchback turns and drops, so that you can fly when you ride.

Are you looking for something specific? Perhaps you would like a 1:1 session? We’ll be happy to help – just get in touch.

Making sure that all our trips and training events are femalefriendly is a big priority for us. But we also run female-only events, for women who would prefer to train and/or ride exclusively with other women.

Skill and fitness levels

If you are at a trip’s stated level, you will generally be well challenged but not overchallenged. The general challenge level covers a combination of riding skill, fitness and other parameters like altitude and degree of exposure on the mountainside. These are presented in more detail in the descriptions of each trip.

In terms of technical difficulty we make reference to the Singletrack Scale (STS), which provides an objective categorisation of routes. It covers technical difficulty only; it does not address issues of required fitness. In addition, each trip’s description covers other factors like how exposed a route is (requires more concentration) or how long we ride at a stated difficulty level. At our Level 1 you ride mainly on forestry roads and straightforward singletracks up to a maximum of S1. At our Level 5, you can look forward to mainly S3 routes: perfect for riders with expert technique who like to work out physical riddles.

Level 1 – Beginners (STS: S0-S1)

This level is aimed at riders with little or no mountainbiking experience.

We ride mainly on gravel, tarmac, or wider off-road tracks without steps, steep descents or tight bends.

Level 2 – Fairly experienced (STS: ~S1)

For reasonably-fit beginners and riders who are transferring to mountainbiking.

Mainly on gravel, forest paths, and easy singletracks with small rocks and tree roots. The terrain is fairly flat with wide bends; tricky elements can be omitted if required.

Level 3 – Intermediate (STS: max. S2)

For fairly experienced mountainbikers who have the basic skills, are physically fit, and want to start attempting more challenging routes.

We ride mainly on straightforward singletracks with longer sections that include rocks, tree roots and small steps. Terrain ranges from level to moderately steep, with tight bends that require good balance and bike control.

Level 4 – Advanced (STS: S2, some sections at S3)

For skilled, fit, regular riders who only want to be dismounting in exceptional situations. Solid skills are necessary. Mainly on singletracks with often challenging sections of rocks and tree roots. Small jumps and technically demanding bends (switchbacks) are the order of the day. The terrain gets steeper, and precise and accurate braking technique is required. Being able to swing the rear wheel around is an advantage, but not essential.

Level 5 – Extremely advanced (STS: ~S3)

For highly experienced riders who want to develop their technique on mountain singletracks.

Exclusively on high altitude routes with in places extremely challenging steep sections, switchback turns and difficult steps (being able to swing the rear wheel around is required). Small jumps and exposed sections are our constant companions. We enjoy a few tricks borrowed from trials riding, e.g. bunny hops, wheelies, rear wheel swinging).

Stated distances and amount of ascent are approximate. The following list below describes the level of physical challenge you can expect on our MTB trips. At Level 1 you will be mainly riding on forestry roads and easy singletracks. There are very few challenging climbs, and there is enough time to warm up and get the body going. Levels 4 and 5 need you to be extremely fit – full days with up to eight hours in the saddle, with frequent long, intense, breathdefying climbs as standard – often on challenging terrain that makes its own demands on fitness. In places you will need to carry your bike.

Level 1 – Relaxed

Bis zu 25 km
Bis zu 400 Höhenmeter

Easy tempo over mainly flat terrain.

Level 2 – Easy-going

25 bis 40 km
400 bis 800 Höhenmeter

Slow to medium speed, over varied terrain.

Level 3 – Sport riding

40 bis 70 km
800 bis 1.200 Höhenmeter

Mediumtempo riding with constantly alternating climbs and descents or longer ascents, on singletracks.

Level 4 – Elite

50 bis 100 km
mehr als 1.000 Höhenmeter

Medium tempo, mainly on singletracks or forestry roads which can be steep. Long uphill rides and continuously demanding singletrack descents.

Level 5 – You what?

At this level, bikes are frequently pushed or carried. Long climbs at high altitude; long, exhausting descents.